Event Details

Thinking routines have become extremely popular over the last decade and are often recognized as a hallmark of Project Zero practices.  With this popularity and wide-spread use has come the opportunity to look more closely at just what effect thinking routines have on teaching, on learning, and on schooling.  These issues could not have been properly examined when thinking routines were first being introduced almost 15 years ago. Now, however, extensive research and ongoing collaboration with schools have generated new learnings that create the opportunity to take the practices of making thinking visible to the next level.


Drawing from the research presented in the new book by Ron Ritchhart and Mark Church, The Power of Making Thinking Visible, this course will explore both the goals and practices associated with making thinking visible, examining six specific ways that thinking routines have “power” for learners and for teachers.  Participants will delve into two of these powers: promoting deep learning and enhancing formative assessment.  Since the best way to learn a routine is to experience it as a learner, throughout the course, participants will use new thinking routines for to deepen their own learning. Each step of the way, the instructors will “pull back the curtain” on the thought process that teachers go through to use the routines to maximum effect. Participants will have the opportunity to develop and receive feedback on plans for implementing these practices in their own context, whatever that context may be: online, in person, or a hybrid of the two. 

The course will explore the following key questions: What are the core practices associated with making thinking visible, and how do they relate to and interact with one another?  What are the benefits or powers—for students and teachers--in making thinking visible? How do the most effective teachers use thinking routines to maximum effect?

Required Text: The course text is The Power of Making Thinking Visible. Please make sure to have access to the text by the start of Week 1. The text is available in both hard copy and ebook formats. If you don’t already have the book, we suggest trying whatever local bookseller you regularly use, checking availability at a local library, or purchasing online at the publisher’s site (Wiley), on Amazon, or through other online book sellers. If you are based in the United States and would like to support independent booksellers while shopping online, consider purchasing your book via Bookshop.org.

What past participants are saying:

“This course was a rich learning experience. It has challenged a 30+-year teacher to rethink teaching and learning.”

March 2021 Participant

“The course’s focus on student-driven learning is incredibly important if we want to produce 21st century learners. The routines and strategies we learned throughout the course will help initiate this.”

March 2021 Participant

“Good professional development for teachers provides concrete strategies that are easy to set up and allow for small changes. The various strategies presented in the course have a wide application and don't require time-consuming preparation. They are very easy to make routine within my own practice.”

March 2021 Participant

“The design of the micro practicum promoted all three types of engagement: with ideas, with others, and with action. As the weekly assignments were built around MTV routines, effective connections were readily made between theory and practice. The routines themselves are accessible and adaptable for all learners, grades, subjects and contexts.”

March 2021 Participant

Course Designers & Instructor

Co-Designer: Ron Ritchhart has been a researcher at Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education since 1994. His research focuses on understanding how to develop, nurture, and sustain thoughtful learning environments for both students and teachers. His interest in “cultures of thinking” has led him to conduct research in such areas as intellectual character, mindfulness, thinking dispositions, teaching for understanding, creativity in teaching, and the development of communities of practice.

Ron's research is classroom and school-based, believing that teaching is a complex art and science that must be understood in context. A strong theme of learning from best practice runs throughout much of Ron’s work. On many of the projects on which Ron has worked, he has produced videos of best practices related to teaching for understanding, creative and innovative teaching, and the use of thinking routines.

Prior to joining the Project Zero research group, Ron taught for fourteen years. He began his teaching career in New Zealand teaching 35 six- and seven-year-olds in a state school in Christchurch as part of a teaching internship program. From there he taught art in Indiana before moving to Denver, Colorado where he taught third and fourth grade. Frustrated with the way he was teaching mathematics, Ron pursued a mathematics education degree and later taught middle school mathematics. In 1993 he received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Secondary Mathematics Teaching.

Ron earned his Ed.D. degree (2000) in human development and psychology from Harvard University. Ron's research on how teachers create thoughtful learning environments that support the development of students' intellectual character was the basis for his book: Intellectual Character: What it is, Why it matters, How to get it. His framework for understanding group culture detailed has been influential in shaping education in schools and museums throughout the world. His new book, Making Thinking Visible, explores how teachers around the world have been using the ideas of Ron and his colleagues at Project Zero to improve students’ learning.

Prior to attending Harvard, he earned a Master of Arts degree (1990) in curriculum and instruction from the University of Colorado at Denver, and a Bachelor of Science degree in education from Indiana University.

Co-Design & Instructor: Mark Church works with schools throughout the world wishing to create cultures of thinking in their classrooms. He believes in the difference teachers can make for students when they strive to make thinking visible, valued, and actively promoted as part of the day-to-day experience of their learners. Mark encourages teachers to become students of their students, and more broadly, students of themselves and the choices they make to leverage the power of making thinking visible.

Mark is currently a consultant with Harvard Project Zero's Making Thinking Visible and Cultures of Thinking initiatives, drawing upon his own classroom teaching experience and from the perspectives he has gained working with educators throughout the world. Together with Ron Ritchhart, Mark is co-author of the book Making Thinking Visible: How to Promote Engagement, Understanding, and Independence for All Learners (Jossey-Bass, 2011) and The Power of Making Thinking Visible: Practices to Engage and Empower All Learners (Jossey-Bass, 2020).

Online Course Schedule

Orientation and course site introduction for the mini courses is available no later than two days prior to the course launch.

  • All participants will receive email invitations to the course site three days prior to the course start. The required review of the course policies assignment is available during the “Getting Ready” self-guided orientation to the site.
  • Remember, if you joined the course as an individual and not as a member of an already formed team, you will be placed on a virtual team and will be sent an email introducing you to your virtual team members no later than 4 days prior to the course launch.
  • We strongly recommend all teams schedule their weekly, required 60- 90 minute team meetings prior to the start of the course. Usually scheduling team meetings toward the end of each week is most helpful so all members have time to complete assignments in advance of the meeting.

Creating Cultures of Thinking: An Introduction (CCoT-I)

  • Week 1: Monday, October 3
  • Week 2: Monday, October 10
  • Week 3: Monday, October 17
  • Week 4: Monday, October 24
  • Course Closes: Sunday, October 30

An Introduction to Maker-Centered Learning (IMCL)

  • Week 1: Monday, October 24
  • Week 2: Monday, October 31
  • Week 3: Monday, November 7
  • Week 4: Monday, November 20
  • Course Closes: Sunday, November 20

The Power of Making Thinking Visible (PMTV)

  • Week 1: Monday, January 16
  • Week 2: Monday, January 23
  • Week 3: Monday, January 30
  • Week 4: Monday, February 6
  • Course Closes: Sunday, February 12

Creating Cultures of Thinking: Investigating the Forces that Shape Culture (CCoT-IFSC)

  • Week 1: Monday, March 6
  • Week 2: Monday, March 13
  • Week 3: Monday, March 20
  • Week 4: Monday, March 27
  • Course Closes: Sunday, April 2

Let’s Play (LP)

  • Week 1: Monday, April 17
  • Week 2: Monday, April 24
  • Week 3: Monday, May 1
  • Week 4: Monday, May 8
  • Course Closes: Sunday, May 14

Who Should Participate

  • Teachers, Teacher Leaders, and School Administrators and Leaders
  • Museum Educators and educators working in informal learning environments
  • Facilitators of Pre-K to Adult Learning

Required Course Textbook

The following textbook is required for participants in this course, and is not included in the course tuition. The textbook is available for purchase on Amazon or through the publisher Jossey-Bass — in both paper and digital format.

  • The Power of Making Thinking Visible: Practices to Engage and Empower All Learners. Ron Ritchhart and Mark Church. (Jossey-Bass/Wiley, 2020)

Tuition, Discounts, and Scholarships

Tuition

  • For In-Depth Courses (6 sessions, 13 weeks), tuition is $615 per person registering as a member of a team, and $695 per person registering as an individual who will be placed (by Project Zero) on a virtual team.
  • For Mini Courses (4 sessions, 4 weeks), tuition is $295 per person registering as a member of a team, and $375 per person registering as an individual who will be placed (by Project Zero) on a virtual team.

Large Group Discount

For groups of 10 or more people registering for either the in-depth or the mini courses, discounts are available. Email pzlearn@gse.harvard.edu for details and registration instructions. Group discounts are not applied retroactively.

Scholarships

Scholarships are available for educators from qualifying organizations. For online courses (in-depth and mini courses) offered from September 2022 through June 2023, scholarships will cover approximately 70% of the tuition. Eligibility guidelines and the application link are below. Scholarship applications must be submitted and accepted prior to registration for the course. If you would like to apply for a scholarship, please do NOT register for the online course until you have completed the scholarship application and have been approved for scholarship. Those who register for the online course prior to applying for a scholarship will become ineligible for the scholarship. Please note: scholarships are limited and are assessed and awarded on a first come, first serve basis.

Eligibility guidelines: With generous support from the Saul Zaentz Charitable Foundation and many individual donations honoring Project Zero’s 50th anniversary in 2017, Project Zero is able to offer a limited number of professional learning scholarships to support a range of schools, districts, and organizations as well as a diverse group of educators. These scholarships aim to support teams of educators and individual educators working in under-resourced contexts and/or with historically marginalized students.

  • In the United States, public school educators working in schools with a free and reduced lunch rate of 25% or more OR educators working primarily with students who attend these schools.
  • Outside of the United States, educators whose schools or organizations serve 25% or more students whose families meet the country-defined standard for low-income.

Apply for a Scholarship

Registration

Register for the Online Course

Confirmation and Payment

Registration confirmations are sent automatically from the registration software. Please keep these emails as they include your receipt of payment for documentation as well as your confirmation number should you need to access your registration in the future.

Payments are accepted via credit card or invoice for payment by check or wire transfer. Confirmation of registration does not confirm full payment if participants selected to pay other than by a credit card. All required paperwork and payments must be completed (or evidence provided of payments in process) by the registration deadline. For participants whose required paperwork and/or payments are not finalized at the registration deadline, they will be removed from the course roster and placed on a wait list.

Deadline for Registration

For Creating Cultures of Thinking: An Introduction (CCoT-I) starting October 3, 2022, the deadline for registration is Monday, September 19, 2022 at 11:59 pm Boston time.

For An Introduction to Maker-Centered Learning (IMCL) starting Monday, October 24, 2022, the deadline for registration is Monday, October 10, 2022 at 11:59 pm Boston time.

For The Power of Making Thinking Visible (PMTV) starting Monday, January 16, 2023, the deadline for registration is Thursday, January 5, 2023 at 11:59 pm Boston time.

For Creating Cultures of Thinking: Investigating the Forces that Shape Culture (CCoT-IFSC) starting Monday, March 6, 2023, the deadline for registration is Monday, February 20, 2023 at 11:59 pm Boston time.

For Let’s Play (LP) starting Monday, April 17, 2023, the deadline for registration is Monday, April 3, 2023 at 11:59 pm Boston time.

Please note: Space is limited. The courses may fill prior to the registration deadline.

Refund Request and Participant Substitution Deadlines

Requests for refunds and participant substitutions for the CCoT-I course starting October 3, 2022 must be submitted by Monday, September 19, 2022 at 11:59 pm Boston time.

Requests for refunds and participant substitutions for the IMCL course starting October 24, 2022 must be submitted by Monday, October 10, 2022 at 11:59 pm Boston time.

Requests for refunds and participant substitutions for the PMTV course starting January 16, 2023 must be submitted by Thursday, January 5, 2023 at 11:59 pm Boston time.

Requests for refunds and participant substitutions for the CCoT-IFSC course starting March 6, 2023 must be submitted by Monday, February 20, 2023 at 11:59 pm Boston time.

Requests for refunds and participant substitutions for the Let's Play course starting April 17, 2023 must be submitted by Monday, April 3, 2023 at 11:59 pm Boston time.

To request a refund, submit a participant substitution, or to ask questions, please email pzlearn@gse.harvard.edu.